Maysville 1829


From The Writings of Caleb Atwater (1833) describing his visit in 1829.
MAYSVILLE is one of the most important towns on the river, between Wheeling and Cincinnati. It presents, from the river, an unbroken front of elegant brick buildings; the streets are well paved; has a good landing, and appears better from the water, than almost any town on the banks of the Ohio. It contains twenty-eight stores of dry goods, three of them large wholesale ones; one large queensware and china store; four groceries; an iron foundry; an extensive paper mill; a manufactory of stone ware, whose make is superior to almost anything of the kind any where; three large churches, belonging to the Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists. As a place of business, it ranks second in this State, Louisville, being the first.
The people of Maysville, for intelligence, industry, enterprise, and sterling patriotism, are surpassed by none in the Union. The town of Maysville was formerly called Limestone; and was either the starting point, or the place where many an Indian expedition ended, in early times. The country back of Maysville is rich and fertile, and the farmers among the best and most wealthy in the west. It contains about three thousand inhabitants, and is increasing in numbers, wealth, business, and importance, every hour. A steamboat runs daily between Maysville and Cincinnati.
The situation of the town is high, dry, and healthy. Stone for building is abundant on the spot, and every article used by the builder is plenty, cheap, and good. It must increase rapidly in all respects, and forever be a town of importance. Why the authors of maps of the United States have neglected, as many of them have, to notice so important a place as this, seems strange indeed.

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